Smeared

It sang beguiling songs of hope for the man who sat under the bridge and ate alone. There was no scene more distressing than what it had seen that day.
A bright day but no sun strung sunbeams in the sky space. Two kids with painted faces, one a clown with a smile for scars and the other a night with eyes for the stars, they ran like how shadows appear, faintly and at once. They laughed like prisoners on the electric chair.

Homeless kids – as beautiful as sadness, as alive as the wild woods. They howled in tones of tired drones because they were kids. They laughed and joked because they were kids. They looked back and smiled because they were kids. They leapt into their fates because they were kids.
And, kids they remained till their dying breath – for, homeless or orphans, crying or battered, weak or weakened, strong or solemn, right or rightful, normal or sensitive, living now dead – they were kids – beaconings of life – something to make of – fresh clay to be shaped into a vessel of a distant hope.
There they lay – dead, below the bridge, the eyes bled red for one, cried white for the other.

It sang beguiling songs of hope, the Grave,

‘No smiles shine on
ghosts of the past
Dead stars shine in
spirits of the future’

for the man who sat under the bridge and ate alone was the father of the freshly abandoned, newly lifeless kids. He eats the last bit of the dry bread loaf. He doesn’t cry, no tears can smear the momentary indecision in which the boys ran away and he never stopped them; only to listen the final screech and the last scream.

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31 comments

  1. This is just marvellous, D! It is totally gripping from the start to the end. The emotions are tightly roped. I was on the edge of my curiosity chair guessing who sang beguiling songs. But the fate in the climax was very heart wrenching. “beaconings of life – something to make of – fresh clay to be shaped into a vessel of a distant hope.”- I am having a splendid crush on this. “They were kids” is the profound thread. The plight of the poor father is just unimaginable. So bad, D! you have drenched me in the rain of sadness today. Since the start of the day, I have cried thrice. But broken is beautifully played in your words. Love it. Keep writing and keep shining. Love to you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, R! I can’t tell you how much your words mean to me – to move somebody to tears – wow, I’m sorry but I am equally delighted. You caught the emotion right on – They were kids – that is the thread and it is a symbolic story for every parent-kid relationship and how one indecision can be devastating, if not death then something worse than that could happen. To be a parent is a greater responsibility than to be kids. To be the anchor is crucial but where the weight flows is even more so.
      I’m so so so much happy after reading your awesome comment – “broken is beautifully played in your words.” thank you, that was my only intention. Love and hugs, my lovely friend! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Pleasure is always mine, dear. You have brilliantly said, “To be a parent is a greater responsibility than to be kids. To be the anchor is crucial but where the weight flows is even more so.” Love your thoughts.
        Shameless…………………you are laughing making me cry. So bad 😦

        Anyway…………………I am happy in your happiness and sad in your sadness.

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      2. beautiful in so many ways… children remaining children, untethered by ideas of hopelessness, despair… to the very last breath. a grown man too deadened by the same ideas to know the joy of abandon. what do we really know about this journey, life?

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      3. Very true, M, the question you put up is legit with no answers – ‘What do we really know about this journey, life?’ nothing, I’d say except for the fact that we have to go through many changes, and still strive to be who we were.
        Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment,M. Appreciate your presence on my blog!

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      1. I love it when poets are brave and free enough to bend/break the “rules” we learned in school–it took me awhile before I could do it; and of course I think we should do it judiciously. It should enrich a poem, not make a reader go, “WHAT??”

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  2. For every writer takes a story differently, I took it in my sense too. This is a sad-tragic end, in my opinion it portrayed me lost abandoned family strings relation. If I am wrong, then could you please guide me?
    The beautification of the post was its simplicity. May a day like this be never seen again. In the hope of hope.

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    1. It is open to interpretations as I’ve never explained what the father really felt after the death of his kids – just the fact that he did not cry as he could not go back in time does not explain much ’cause he could have or could not have regretted, so that’s something I leave up to you. It’s an open ending. 🙂
      Thanks so much for the appreciation, Nishita. This was my first shot at a prose, I’m glad you gave a thought to it and commented. It made me very happy and has encouraged me to try again.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This is wonderful writing: intriguing, melancholic, wistful and symbolic. You weave characters beautifully into the theme of this piece, and, for me, the best part is that you leave space for your reader’s imagination. Great writing!

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    1. Thank you for the kind words. I feel humbled by all the appreciation. I’m glad you liked how it ended, as you so beautifully said – ‘leave space for your reader’s imagination’, open endings are intriguing and I always try to go for it! Thanks so much for the encouragement!

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  4. This is very powerful, very well written, but very disturbing to me. I am not trying to be personal, but what prompted you to write such a dark piece, without any light, particularly given your “there is no sky, only stars”. Where is the light in this piece? I must ask.

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  5. Maybe if you added as the last line, “On this day, there was no sky, and even the stars could not shine, and could not cry”, something to that effect, some context, some larger context to give a framework to this terrifying tale.

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    1. Ah, I am so sorry if it was distressing to you -it’s just a work of fiction and sadness is possibly the best subject I can write on ’cause I am comfortable with it. About the last line, sure it does not resonate with the header of my blog but so does many other poems here – there’s Light in this story if you’d like to see it – it’s all up to you.
      I love the sentence – “On this day, there was no sky, and even the stars could not shine, and could not cry” – I’ll definitely keep that in mind from the next time, as in make the stories lighter.
      Thanks so much for the feedback, always appreciated!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Staci. I am very glad that it held you throughout, I love writing sad but I hope it wasn’t too much as the end is open to interpretations. 🙂
      You’re so kind, thank you for always being SO supportive.

      P.S – I am listening to Erika at the moment, your voice is lovely. 🙂

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